Tomatoes being swamped boiled water in process of canning. Canned tomato - good winter vegeterian food.

About us

Keeping our design solutions simple and usable, creating a winning environment that allows for partnerships in worldwide production distribution.

ViscoDisc™ is a South African innovation designed and developed to solve a packaging problem. It has successfully achieved its objectives, with a string of added bonus benefits that puts this simple looking invention into a class of its own.

This product is the ViscoDisc™ insert, which has been very successful in solving the perennial question of how to stop bottled produce from protruding above its preserving liquid.

Home-use-V2
HOME USE
EASY TO INSERT & REMOVE
Home-use-products-V2
HOME USE
PRODUCTS AVAILABLE
Commercial-use-V2
COMMERCIAL USE
EXTENDED SHELF LIFE
Commercial-use-products-V2
COMMERCIAL USE
PRODUCTS AVAILABLE

TESTIMONIALS

I have always been fascinated by the product – I realised the benefits for draining but I never actually thought through the benefit of keeping the produce below the level of the liquid – very clever & so simple.

Jeanne

I ordered ViscoDisc inserts and hand inserters and will now never look back. No longer do I put a down-turned orange half on the rest of the product before sealing – the insert works like a dream and keeps the rest of the fruit down and the liquid covering and protecting the rest.

Pat

I’ve just used the Viscodisc for my first lot of pickled shallots. Worked a treat and I can’t wait for them to be available in the shops.

Val Harrison

Hi, this works really really well, I was surprised to see how easy it is to use and it works so well. This is a great invention!

Wendy – home user

I can’t believe how easy this is to use. It makes the whole process a lot easier. Cool little device making life simpler, you must give this a try if you can or bottle!

John

” … fashioned small ceramic or glass weights for this ; a South African company is producing a plastic insert it calls the ViscoDisc to keep vegetables submerged in jars. …”

Sandor Katz – The Art of Fermentation (page 101)